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focusing on words and literature

Come outside too by Tei-jo

haiku

Nakamura Tei-jo was one of the most prominent female poets within Ezu, Japan during the twentieth century. Her efforts to bring attention to women’s haiku writing via mass media with the journal Hototogisu. It was in this journal Tei-jo published her first collection of haiku and allowed her the experience necessary to advance to found [...]

Getting old by Socho

haiku

Artist, chronicler, and haiku/renga poet Takebe Socho earned praise and recognition for his work and as the son of famed calligrapher Yamamoto Ryosai. As a disciple of Buddhist monk and renga master Iio Sogi, Socho learned much from his master and the experiences he encountered during the Muromachi period. He worked closely with other students [...]

The sound of the raindrops by Santoka

haiku

Taneda Santoka was the pen name of Taneda Shoichi, the Japanese author and poet best known for the twentieth century movement of free verse haiky. As one of the most prominent “rebel” writers of the time period, Santoka’s work and lifestyle were quite unconventional and riddled with suffering. Financial problems, family struggles, and loss seasoned [...]

a quiet afternoon by Larry Gates

haiku

Professional photographer and educator on underwater photography, Larry Gates’ passion for and contributions to the earth’s seas and waterways is a finely honed craft based in sheer devotion. As a consultant for numerous magazines and film companies, his expertise in the field is truly exceptional. Having penned The Beginner’s Guide to Underwater Digital Photography, Gates [...]

Two old bent backs by Anonymous

haiku

This haiku was written by an anonymouse author. Otherwise unknown but revered nonetheless. Two old bent backs sitting close, wrapped in a shower of cicada songs From: Haiku An Anthology of Japanese Poems by Stephen Addiss, Rumiko Yamamoto, and Akira Yamamoto

Among these mountains by James W. Hackett

haiku

Contemporary American poet and philosopher James W. Hackett devoted his life’s work to preserving and pioneering the ancient Japanese art of haiku in his native language, English. Vitally instrumental in bringing haiku to the U.S., Hackett’s efforts greatly assisted in making this form of poetry highly popular throughout the States and in other countries. Dubbed [...]

The wind is mournful by Kyotai

haiku

A vivid imagination and a firm hold in tradition allowed Japanese poet Kyotai the creative space to offer generations of readers a sensory expedition in words. Following the influence established by haiku masters Basho and Buson, Kyotai’s work assisted in elevating haiku beyond the typical coarse and unrefined style typical of the 1700s. The wind [...]

My go rival by Anonymous

haiku

This haiku was written by an anonymous author. Otherwise unknown but revered nonetheless. My go rival – how vexing and how dear” From: Haiku An Anthology of Japanese Poems by Stephen Addiss, Rumiko Yamamoto, and Akira Yamamoto

For me leaving by Shiki

haiku

Masaoka Shiki was one of the most prominent haiku masters of the Meiji period within Japan. Considered one of the four haiku masters, Shiki’s work as a literary critic, poet, and author helped to shape the development of haiku and tanka. Though his life was brief (he passed away in his mid thirties,) Shiki’s craft [...]

Taking a nap by Buson

haiku

Yosa (or also Taniguchi) Buson is highly esteemed and considered one of the greatest artists in the Bunjina literarti style. Second only to Basho in terms of haiku mastery, Buson began training as a late teen in Edo (Tokyo) under the instruction of Matsumara Goshun and became the best known disciple of his teacher. With [...]