WordFocus.com

focusing on words and literature

Who’s Vs. Whose

vs A common mistake many make is found in the usage of the words “who’s” and “whose.” To help prevent this, remember that “who’s” is a contraction for “who is” or sometimes “who has” whereas “whose” is the possessive form of who. Though an apostrophe “s” generally suggests possession, in the case of who, it’s a contraction.
For example:

Who’s this? questions who is this?

Vs.

Whose socks are these? questions who the socks belong to.

Remember to save the apostrophe and if you can not replace the word with “who is” or “who has,” use whose.

Who’s vs. Whose
Who’s and whose sound just alike, but they have very different meanings. “Who’s” is a contraction for “who is” or “who has.” “Whose” is the possessive form of who.

The test for which one to use is quite simple. If you can replace the word “who’s” with “who is” or “who has,” you know “who’s” is the correct word. If the replacement won’t work, you should use “whose.”

Example: Who’s leaving dirty dishes around the house? Oh, I know whose dishes these are!