WordFocus.com

focusing on words and literature

English words coming coming from Allos, Ambulare, Arch, Bellum and Bellarge



Most of the English language originated from another language. Many English words have roots in the Greek and Latin languages.


Allos

English words derived from the Greek word “allos” meaning “other” and the Latin word “alter” meaning “other.”

Words with these derivations often describe how people, while social in nature, prefer to live in communities of people like them. People become frightened and threatened by “others.”

Examples of words containing the Greek and Latin “other” include:


  • alien- a foreigner, an outsider
  • alter- to change or make different

Ambulare

English words derived from the Latin word “ambulare” meaning “to move or to walk.”

How did we go from “walking” to an ambulance speeding down the street with sirens wailing? In the 19th century, the French developed mobile hospitals called “hopital ambulants.” From there, the derivation “ambulance” was born.

Examples of English words using the Latin “ambulare” include:

  • ambulatory- to walk
  • perambulator- a baby buggy designed for outdoor use

Arch

English words derived from the Latin word “arch” meaning “the first, the beginning, the ruler or leader.”

Being first can have different meanings. It is possible to be first in a time-period, or first in terms of ranking or importance.

Examples of English words using the Latin “arch” include:

  • monarch- the first or head ruler
  • anarchy- the absence of a ruler or leader, chaos

Bellum and Bellarge

English words derived from the Latin “bellum” and “bellarge” meaning “war” or “the act of waging war.”

The American Civil War is so important to the US, the Latin word “antebellum” meaning “before the start of the war” is used to characterize a specific period in history.

Examples of English words using the Latin “bellum” and “bellarge” include:

  • rebel- a person who revolts or resists authority
  • belligerent- always hostile, rude, ready to make war